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Golden Goose Award

The Science Coalition is a founding organization of the Golden Goose Award. The purpose of the Golden Goose Award is to demonstrate the human and economic benefits of federally funded research by highlighting examples of seemingly obscure studies that have led to major breakthroughs and resulted in significant societal impact.


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ScienceWorksForU.S.

ScienceWorksForU.S. is a joint project of The Science Coalition, the Association of American Universities and the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities to inform policymakers and the public of the devastating impact that sequestration is having on federally funded scientific research.

Universities conduct the majority of basic scientific and medical research in the United States and, as such, are ground zero for the discovery and innovation that fuels the economy, as well as for the education of future scientists, engineers, doctors, teachers and entrepreneurs.

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Innovation Deficit

Close the Innovation Deficit is an effort by the business, higher education, scientific, and high-tech manufacturing communities who are concerned about cuts and stagnating federal investments in research and higher education at a time when other nations are investing heavily in these areas. The Science Coalition supports the effort to Close the Innovation Deficit and believes sustained federal investments in research and higher education are necessary to develop the ideas, people, and innovations that power our economy, create jobs, improve health, and strengthen our national security.


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SCIENCE 2034

What does science hold for the future? SCIENCE 2034 is an initiative by The Science Coalition to mark our 20th anniversary by looking forward 20 years and focusing on the possibilities of the future.

While we don’t know what the next “Big Thing” will be, we can make some educated predictions about how well-funded scientific research might change our lives and our world. At www.Science2034.org we ask scientists, policymakers and thought leaders to weigh in and tell us what they think science will enable 20 years from now and what that will mean to individuals, society and the world.


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The Science Coalition

PECASE Winners & Media Participate in Science Roundtable

October 13, 2011

 

What are we on the cusp of discovering? How are U.S. policies helping to support those scientific discoveries? In the video below, recipients of Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE) discuss the role of federal funding in advancing their research, training the next generation of scientists and keeping America at the forefront of innovation.

The Science Coalition hosted a Science Roundtable discussion on October 13, 2011 featuring winners of the prestigious Presidential Early-Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE) from universities around the country. The on-the-record event was held at the National Press Club in Washington, DC.


“If you stop investing in research and development, you very quickly cease to have any sort of leading edge in the world economy,” says Lilianne Mujica-Parodi, assistant professor of biomedical engineering at Stony Brook University, whose research is supported by the National Science Foundation. “If you really think that what we can compete on globally is innovation, then you have to start educating the scientists of tomorrow, today.”


Participants included Michael Arnold, assistant professor of materials science and engineering at the University of Wisconsin-Madison; Noah Cowan, associate professor of mechanical engineering at Johns Hopkins University; Dirk Englund, assistant professor of electrical engineering and of applied physics at Columbia University; Michael Escuti, associate professor of electrical and computer engineering at North Carolina State University; Ian Howat, assistant professor in the School of Earth Sciences at Ohio State University; Gang Logan Liu, professor of electrical and computer engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Benjamin Mazin, assistant professor of physics, University of California, Santa Barbara; Lilianne Mujica-Parodi, assistant professor of biomedical engineering at Stony Brook University; and Linda Wilbrecht, assistant professor of neurology at the University of California, San Francisco.

The PECASE is the highest honor bestowed by the U.S. government on science and engineering professionals in the early stages of their independent research careers. These young researchers are leading pioneering work that has wide-ranging implications for health, energy, security, communications and the environment, as well as helping to motivate and train next-generation scientists and engineers.


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