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Golden Goose Award

The Science Coalition is a founding organization of the Golden Goose Award. The purpose of the Golden Goose Award is to demonstrate the human and economic benefits of federally funded research by highlighting examples of seemingly obscure studies that have led to major breakthroughs and resulted in significant societal impact.


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ScienceWorksForU.S.

ScienceWorksForU.S. is a joint project of The Science Coalition, the Association of American Universities and the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities to inform policymakers and the public of the devastating impact that sequestration is having on federally funded scientific research.

Universities conduct the majority of basic scientific and medical research in the United States and, as such, are ground zero for the discovery and innovation that fuels the economy, as well as for the education of future scientists, engineers, doctors, teachers and entrepreneurs.

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Innovation Deficit

Close the Innovation Deficit is an effort by the business, higher education, scientific, and high-tech manufacturing communities who are concerned about cuts and stagnating federal investments in research and higher education at a time when other nations are investing heavily in these areas. The Science Coalition supports the effort to Close the Innovation Deficit and believes sustained federal investments in research and higher education are necessary to develop the ideas, people, and innovations that power our economy, create jobs, improve health, and strengthen our national security.


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SCIENCE 2034

What does science hold for the future? SCIENCE 2034 is an initiative by The Science Coalition to mark our 20th anniversary by looking forward 20 years and focusing on the possibilities of the future.

While we don’t know what the next “Big Thing” will be, we can make some educated predictions about how well-funded scientific research might change our lives and our world. At www.Science2034.org we ask scientists, policymakers and thought leaders to weigh in and tell us what they think science will enable 20 years from now and what that will mean to individuals, society and the world.


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The Science Coalition

Third Annual Golden Goose Awards Ceremony Honors Odd, Obscure Research That Led to Groundbreaking Discoveries

September 18, 2014

Eight researchers were honored at the third annual Golden Goose Award ceremony on September 18, for their roles in improving the health of premature infants and in paving the way for the telecommunications and supercomputing revolutions. The researchers’ work was supported by the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health and the former Atomic Energy Commission.

The awardees were honored at a ceremony at the Library of Congress in Washington, DC, where a bipartisan group of Members of Congress presented the awards.  Representative Jim Cooper, Representative Randy Hultgren, Representative Rush Holt and Senator Chris Coons were on hand to make remarks. The honorees were:

Larry Smarr, a physicist whose work at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign on the physics of black hole collisions led him to advance a federal commitment to dramatically enhance U.S. computing power and to foster the development of NCSA Mosaic, the precursor to today’s web browsers.

Robert Wilson, Paul Milgrom and R. Preston McAfee, economists whose basic research on game theory and auctions - conducted at Stanford University, Northwestern University and the University of Texas - enabled the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to first auction spectrum licenses in 1994, which helped make possible the telecommunications revolution.

Saul Schanberg (deceased), Tiffany Martini Field, Cynthia Kuhn and Gary Evoniuk, scientists at Duke University and the University of Miami whose research, which included massaging rat pups, led to the groundbreaking discovery of the importance of touch to human development and the introduction of massage as a dramatically successful element of treatment for premature infants.

The purpose of the Golden Goose Award is to demonstrate the human and economic benefits of federally funded research by highlighting examples of seemingly obscure or unusual studies that have led to major breakthroughs and have had a significant impact on society.  Such breakthroughs may include development of life-saving medicines and treatments; game-changing social and behavioral insights; and major technological advances related to national security, energy, the environment, communications, and public health.

The Golden Goose Award was originally the idea of Representative Jim Cooper (D-TN).  It was created and jointly launched by a coalition of organizations, listed below, which believe that federally funded basic scientific research is the cornerstone of American innovation and essential to our economic growth, health, global competitiveness, and national security.  The award recipients were selected by a panel of respected scientists and university research leaders.

Watch this year's video honoring the 2014 recipients here.  


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