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Golden Goose Award

The Science Coalition is a founding organization of the Golden Goose Award. The purpose of the Golden Goose Award is to demonstrate the human and economic benefits of federally funded research by highlighting examples of seemingly obscure studies that have led to major breakthroughs and resulted in significant societal impact.


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ScienceWorksForU.S.

ScienceWorksForU.S. is a joint project of The Science Coalition, the Association of American Universities and the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities to inform policymakers and the public of the devastating impact that sequestration is having on federally funded scientific research.

Universities conduct the majority of basic scientific and medical research in the United States and, as such, are ground zero for the discovery and innovation that fuels the economy, as well as for the education of future scientists, engineers, doctors, teachers and entrepreneurs.

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Innovation Deficit

Close the Innovation Deficit is an effort by the business, higher education, scientific, and high-tech manufacturing communities who are concerned about cuts and stagnating federal investments in research and higher education at a time when other nations are investing heavily in these areas. The Science Coalition supports the effort to Close the Innovation Deficit and believes sustained federal investments in research and higher education are necessary to develop the ideas, people, and innovations that power our economy, create jobs, improve health, and strengthen our national security.


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Early career researchers share their views on the state of science in the U.S.

April 15, 2014

On April 15, 2014, The Science Coalition hosted a Media Roundtable featuring winners of the prestigious Presidential Early-Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE) from universities across the country. The PECASE is the highest honor bestowed by the U.S. government on science and engineering professionals in the early stages of their independent research careers. As leaders in their field, the researchers were nominated by a variety of government agencies including the Department of Defense, the Department of Health and Human Services, the Department of Energy, the National Science Foundation, and the Department of Commerce.

The event, which took place at the National Press Club in Washington, DC, provided PECASE honorees with an opportunity to talk with reporters about their innovative work, the role of federal research funding, and the state of the U.S. research enterprise.

Panelists discussed the challenges facing early-career scientists, as well as what factors contributed to their success. While they expressed frustration over Washington gridlock, they were optimistic about the future of research.

“I think the future of research really depends on whether the current funding stays the same or changes. If it doesn’t change, I think we’re going to lose really good people and good people aren’t going to enter into academic careers. But hopefully it will be better. I’m optimistic,” said Jennifer Reed, associate professor of chemical and biological engineering at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

“We have the tools and the talent to be a 10, we just need [the government] to put us on the right path,” said Brian Anderson, GE Plastics Material Engineering Professor at West Virginia University.

Panel participants included Brian Anderson, GE Plastics Material Engineering Professor, Chemical Engineering at West Virginia University; Andrew Goodman, assistant professor of microbial pathogenesis at the Yale University School of Medicine; Samantha Hansen, assistant professor of geological sciences at the University of Alabama; Mona Jarrahi, associate professor of electrical engineering at the University of California, Los Angeles and adjunct faculty at the electrical engineering and computer science department at the University of Michigan; Lane Martin, professor of materials science and engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Jonathan Pillow, assistant professor of psychology and neurobiology at the University of Texas at Austin; Rodney Priestley, assistant professor of chemical and biological engineering at Princeton University; Katherine Rauen, professor in the Department of Pediatrics and physician-scientist affiliated with the University of California, Davis MIND Institute and UC Davis Children’s Hospital; Jennifer Reed, associate professor of chemical and biological engineering at the University of Wisconsin-Madison; and Ana Maria Rey, JILA Fellow and assistant professor in the Department of Physics at the University of Colorado Boulder.

Listen to Part 1 of the discussion

Listen to Part 2 of the discussion

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