x

For Members

User: Password:  

x

Golden Goose Award

The Science Coalition is a founding organization of the Golden Goose Award. The purpose of the Golden Goose Award is to demonstrate the human and economic benefits of federally funded research by highlighting examples of seemingly obscure studies that have led to major breakthroughs and resulted in significant societal impact.


Continue
x

ScienceWorksForU.S.

ScienceWorksForU.S. is a joint project of The Science Coalition, the Association of American Universities and the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities to inform policymakers and the public of the devastating impact that sequestration is having on federally funded scientific research.

Universities conduct the majority of basic scientific and medical research in the United States and, as such, are ground zero for the discovery and innovation that fuels the economy, as well as for the education of future scientists, engineers, doctors, teachers and entrepreneurs.

Continue
x

Innovation Deficit

Close the Innovation Deficit is an effort by the business, higher education, scientific, and high-tech manufacturing communities who are concerned about cuts and stagnating federal investments in research and higher education at a time when other nations are investing heavily in these areas. The Science Coalition supports the effort to Close the Innovation Deficit and believes sustained federal investments in research and higher education are necessary to develop the ideas, people, and innovations that power our economy, create jobs, improve health, and strengthen our national security.


Continue
x

SCIENCE 2034

What does science hold for the future? SCIENCE 2034 is an initiative by The Science Coalition to mark our 20th anniversary by looking forward 20 years and focusing on the possibilities of the future.

While we don’t know what the next “Big Thing” will be, we can make some educated predictions about how well-funded scientific research might change our lives and our world. At www.Science2034.org we ask scientists, policymakers and thought leaders to weigh in and tell us what they think science will enable 20 years from now and what that will mean to individuals, society and the world.


Continue

The Science Coalition

The Science Coalition Hosts Seventh Annual Media Roundtable

March 22, 2006

Presidents of ten TSC member institutions and a record 26 members of the media attended The Science Coalition’s seventh annual national media roundtable in New York City on March 22 at the Penn Club.  The attendees took part in a lively two-hour discussion that covered science funding, energy policy, and many other issues facing higher education, the science community and the nation.

President Michael Crow of Arizona State University hosted the event, with Chancellor Mark Wrighton of Washington University in St. Louis serving as co-chair.  They were joined by President Lee Todd of the University of Kentucky, Chancellor Jim Oblinger of North Carolina State University, President William Powers of the University of Texas at Austin, President Joel Seligman of the University of Rochester, President Shirley Strum Kenny of Stony Brook University, President Lawrence Bacow of Tufts University, Chancellor Carol Tomlinson-Keasey of the University of California, Merced, and President Lou Anna Simon of Michigan State University.

Media outlets present at the event included The New York Times, Los Angeles Times, CNBC, PBS, Chronicle of Higher Education, Newsday, Popular Mechanics, Popular Science, Bloomberg News, Inside Higher Ed, R&D Magazine, The Scientist, WNBC, Psychology Today, and others.

The most prevalent topic of the evening’s discussion was the nation’s dependence on oil and how research at universities could help the country solve this crisis.  The TSC participants all agreed that this was an area where basic research should truly show its value to the country.  The “Rising Above the Gathering Storm” report was referenced several times by both the reporters and the university leaders as laying out very clearly what strategies might work to help us remain competitive, provide jobs, and investigate new energy sources.
Other topics covered by the group included:

• Competition from other countries in training the next generation of innovators.  Participants held a lengthy discussion on the challenges of retaining the best and brightest faculty and students in the face of the growing prominence of foreign universities.  There was a significant interest in US university partnerships with Chinese and other overseas universities.  Some university members preferred to look upon the current state of competitiveness as an opportunity and not a crisis.

• Federal funding for science.  Participants discussed the need for growth in funding for all fields of science, stressing the interdisciplinary nature of research on campuses today.

• The role of universities in studying growth.  Several university panelists highlighted programs on their campuses that work cooperatively with economists and scientists to study sustainable growth, technology and other issues.

• Retaining students in math, science and engineering at all levels.  This was designated as a key competitiveness issue.  Many university representatives spoke about campus programs working specifically toward higher retention rates.

• General higher education issues.  Reporters were interested in a broader range of topics in higher education, including patents and conflicts of interest, the cost of higher education, partnerships with industry, and intelligent design.


For Members

User: Password: